Portfolio Pages

Today I spent pretty much all day making a 20 page portfolio for tomorrows deadline. For a more visually creative effect, I added faded collage images on every page background.  I used a mix of primary and secondary images to construct the layout.

Here are some portfolio pages for this terms project:

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Design Selection

So its two days until my deadline and hand in my project for this term!  After finishing up my 2000 word report, I am now selecting the sketched garments and finalizing my capsule collection. There are 70 garment designs in total that consist of 35 jacket/poncho designs, 20 tops, and 15 bottoms. Combining the right garments to create an outfit is certainly taking its time! The finalized collection will be posted in upcoming posts.

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Poncho Working Drawing

Today I used the Kaledo Lectra software to create a working drawing for my poncho. Used to convey design ideas and garment details to pattern cutters and machinists, it is essential that they are drawn accurately to avoid misunderstanding and costly mistakes in sampling and production. They must indicate what type of stitching goes where, the measurements, and what type of finishing/fabric the garment is going to have.

My Garment has the following description:

  • 3 layer poncho
  • Front Poncho (Layer 1) had a detachable bag with a zipper along the center front. (zippers connect them)
  • Side seams, center front seam, center back seam, hood seam, neckline seam are overlocked
  • 1m strap and double jetted zip pockets at the back of the bag
  • Zippers are stitched on
  • Zipper seams are 57cm
  • 2nd and 3rd layer have a zipper seam attaching/separating them to make a sleeve
  • Hood length is 40 cm
  • Hood facing width is 2cm folded (not folded its 4cm)
  • Zippers/bag strap(made of bag webbing) are white

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The Rain Poncho

So today I was able to finally finish my final garment! It took slightly longer than expected though, due to “unforeseen circumstances”, in regards to working with the laminated silk fabric. At the beginning of the week, I started off by cutting the appropriate pattern pieces. Before cutting each piece out however, I had to laminate the surface of the silk using a heat presser. Things I had to consider while laminating include to make sure that the silky fabric didn’t slip of the pressing board. It did that with larger pieces which proved to be quite challenging at times. After placing the fabric, I put the plastic on top of the front side of the fabric and pressed it for 15-30 seconds at 150 degrees. Once the fabric was laminated, it thankfully made pattern cutting so much easier. Toiling with silk was rather difficult, due to the fabric constantly slipping.

However as I mentioned, “unforeseen circumstances” got in the way of finishing my poncho sooner than I had originally planned. The first circumstance was when I incorrectly overlocked the facing of my hood. Rather than making a new one, I decided that I wanted to cover the overlock stitching with by binding it. Unfortunately, the stitching of the binding was rather atrocious and overall just had a really poor finishing. This resulted in me cutting out a new hood pattern anyway…I still can’t get over how it took me 10 hours that day to work on hoods! (WHAT WAS I THINKING??)

The next unfortunate happening occurred when I accidentally pressed a folded surface of the laminated poncho together while ironing away the creases! I sadly had no choice but to peal off the plastic and repress that particular area. Luckily you aren’t able to tell  that the plastic was pealed off and it looks good as new! (THANK GOD)

Even though working with laminated fabric proved to be rather challenging at times, the outcome of the product made the whole manufacturing process worth it! I wouldn’t mind exploring this particular technique in future projects. (3rd year collection?) Tomorrow I will be enjoying the nice sunny weather at a BBQ while at the same time doing a photoshoot for my final piece. Photos of the “BBQ SHOOT” will be on the upcoming blog post. In the meantime, below are images of the finished laminated silk poncho as well as some of its manufacturing process:

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Front and Back of Poncho

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Failed Hood

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Attaching the hood

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Ripped Plastic

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Bag Construction

 

My Dresser Experience at South Coast Fashion Week

So last weekend from the 9th-11th of May was the debut of South Coast Fashion Week. It was the first major fashion event ever in the south coast of England that showcased exhibition stands of high street brands, live music, and catwalk shows. The third year students from the Arts University Bournemouth were able to debut their major final year collection to the general public, which provided them great local media exposure.

Throughout the whole event I signed up to work backstage as a dresser. I would say that the most exciting/terrifying thing about being a dresser is that knowing that the outfit you just put together is going to be viewed by a live audience. Exciting because when looking through press coverage images after the show you get to point out which model/s you dressed and which outfits and be like “OMG I DRESSED HER”. However the thought of messing up and dressing someone in the wrong/ not the whole outfit is very very terrifying.. Whats just as bad is when a model misses their queue because he/she wasn’t dressed on time, making the whole dynamic of the runway show somewhat awkward. Thankfully I didn’t had to go through such an unfortunate ordeal and things went rather smoothly.

On Friday I worked dressing the womenswear and on Saturday/Sunday the childrenswear collections. However each morning I would start working in womenswear for fitting sessions and then worked with the kids later on in the afternoon. The mornings typically started off with checking if each garment bag hung up on the rails contained the right garments/accessories. Then there were last minute fittings with models such as making sure that shoes had the appropriate size for each model etc. The dressing process during the actual show however only lasts for about 20 minutes, providing quite the adrenaline rush. During this chaotic environment, making fast clothing changes did not prove to be as easy at times. Some of the tops I had to dress on some of the womenswear models had really tight necklines (I mean seriously why so tight??). I had to be careful not to rip nor smudge the clothing with makeup and not to mention choke the poor girl! On saturday, I had to literally go behind the catwalk to dress a kidswear model for three quick outfit changes! My god that was insane!! Normally the models would have to run back into the dressing rooms where we would dress them, but this model had super quick changes that I had to follow her up behind the stage. Thankfully she was great to work with and she didn’t miss any of her queues. However when had to safety pin one of her outfits at one point, I couldn’t get the pin off her right away and had a slight freak out! I had another freak out on sunday during dressing, when one of the girls was dressed in the wrong finale outfit! Thankfully we changes her in the right one on time. Despite the slight freak outs, I enjoyed working backstage! Working as a dresser, you better be comfortable with stress and partial nudity because if not, this defiantly is the wrong environment for you… Overall though, its something I would recommend to any other fashion student or anyone who has a general interest in fashion, as it provides a good industry insight and professional experience.

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I swear I sew better!

So yesterday I was able to finish my third and final poncho toile. My last two ones where made out of calico and seeing as my final fabric is going to be silk satin, I needed to see how a light weight fabric would affect the overall silhouette. I had to make a few changes on my pattern pieces such as making sure that the shoulder seams would match up. Overall toiling with a delicate light weight fabric such as silk made the pattern cutting and sewing a little challenging as the fabric is rather slippery. This is something I need to be cautious about when using my final fabric. The finishing and stitching towards the end is not my best, but I am certain it will look much cleaner on my final garment. Thankfully I will be laminating my silk with PVC which will make it less slippery and easier to work with! Below are images of how I constructed my toile:

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Toile Construction:

1. Cut out the main patterns which are the front, back and hood.

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Front

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Back

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Hood

2. Sew the front and the backs together. Sew the two back halves together along the center back. Then sew the fronts together along the center front but leaving 10cm allowance from the neckline downwards. Afterwards, sew the front and back together along the shoulder creating a shoulder seam.

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3. Sew the inside sleeves together with a 56cm zipper. (To make it look more fitted, add a snap button on the front at the end closest to the waist.

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4. Overlock the hood onto the neckline. When using silk, try and avoid creating pleats along the neckline.

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AVOID  PLEATS!!!

5. Construct and sew the detachable bag and add double jetted pockets with zips. Press on interfacing on where the inside of the bag is going to be to make it more stiff.

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6. Use the back bag pattern to mark the zipper opening. Mark 16cm for the opening and stitching line. Then mark 1cm from the top and bottom of the 2 end points to draw a triangle.

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 7. Fold jets in half and press. When using silk, add facing so the fabric is more stiff.

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 8. Fold fusible in quarters then mark the opening line in the center.

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9. Place jets on the opening line and stitch along the markings. When doing this, make sure the fusible is on the back side to stitch everything all together. Then cut the opening line open but leaving 1cm allowance on each end. Cut triangles on the ends instead when folding the jets inside easier.

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10. Stitch on zipper on the jets.

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11. Attach pocket bag. make sure to overlock the edges.

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12. Add leaf design detail by stitching on rope creating leaf vine designs. Add binding to get rid of the raw edges. Then sew One half of the open zip.

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Stitching and finishing needs to be WAY better than this!!

13. Zip on bag halves on each side of the front.

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14. Voila the final outcome!

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